INTERVIEW with VICTORIA HINES

What has been your process with working on your project? Do you do something specific to jumpstart your creative process? Please describe it.

This is a story that I have been wanting to tell for over 6 years. For the longest time, I didn’t know how to tell it. I didn’t have the “in” to the play. When I worked on The Wolves last winter, I quickly realized how few plays were out there brimming with amazing roles for young women. Also, how rarely we get to hear from teenage girls. I suddenly realized that was my in. This is a story and point of view lacking in our world and I want to fill that void. I started jotting down notes or thoughts for months, but it wasn’t until I had a mentor that I felt the pressure to actually start producing something. I needed someone, other than myself, to report to.

I found that I often needed to carve out 2-4 solid hours of time to disappear into my laptop at a coffee house somewhere. It was escaping the traditional setting I lived in everyday that helped me transition into production mode. Sometimes if I felt stuck, my mentor mentioned to open a document and just start writing. It didn’t matter if it had anything to do with the play. Oftentimes, what I wrote resembled a journal entry. But by writing anything, I was able to transition my mind into a creative flow. Eventually, I always switched over to writing the play.

What has been a challenge about this project? A surprise?

I think the biggest challenge, at first, was figuring how and where I could be the most productive. Once I figured that out, though, it was forcing myself to keep writing straight through without going back and making edits. I knew that if I edited every time I opened the document, I would never finish. A surprise for me was how quickly I was actually able to produce this piece. For something that has been germinating for years, to turn around a have a first draft in a few months was such a surprise. I told myself I’d finish by the end of last year, and I did.

Is there anything you’ve learned, or are learning, from this process?

I’ve learned a lot about breaking a project into smaller, manageable segments. Writing a full length play is daunting when you think about it. But once I started chipping away at individual scenes, it all started coming together. Focusing on one scene at a time really helped me overcome my fear of the project at hand.

I think the other thing I’ve learned is how to have confidence in my own voice and not be afraid to tell my story. It’s something I’m still learning how to do. Writing this story is very personal and a very vulnerable place to be. Sharing it with the world is even scarier…but exciting at the same time. I hope I continue to remember that places of vulnerability and fear are often the most creatively rewarding.

What do you create time for that feeds your creativity?

Hmmm… this is a hard one. I have so many passions that I sometimes bounce all over the place. I’ve recently become a strong believer in mindfulness. Practicing meditation or yoga has reminded me how to root back into my body and let my mind flow without letting my brain get in the way of itself. I also find that going on walks by myself is often when I have the best creative thoughts or ideas. There is something about physical movement that really frees up my mind for creativity I think.


Paul Kite